List of Maniraptors

I'm compiling a list of maniraptor genera here. I will include some information on each taxon, including the year they were named and where they were found. I hope to include the Cenozoic taxa someday, but for now I'm focusing on the Mesozoic ones. If you see any errors or omissions, please leave a comment!

Other non-technical resources I've used for cross-checking this list include Holtz's Winter 2011 Dinosaur Genus List, The Compact Thescelosaurus, The Theropod Database, DinoData (now defunct), and A Field Guide to Mesozoic Birds and Other Winged Dinosaurs by Matt Martyniuk.

Therizinosaurs
-Alxasaurus (1993): Early Cretaceous (Albian) Mongolia. The first basal therizinosaur known. Showed that therizinosaurs were maniraptors. Might have been a more generalist feeder than other therizinosaurs.
-Beipiaosaurus (1999): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The first therizinosaur found with preserved feathers. EBFFs (Elongated Broad Filamentous Feathers) were first discovered in this taxon. Had a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians.
-Enigmosaurus (1983): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Mongolia. Known from only a pelvis. Probably the same as Erlikosaurus.
-Erliansaurus (2002): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. A transitional form between basal therizinosaurs and therizinosaurids.
-Erlikosaurus (1980): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Mongolia. Was found with a well-preserved skull. Biomechanical studies show it had a weak bite force consistent with a herbivorous diet. Therizinosaur eggs found in China may belong to this taxon.
-Eshanosaurus (2001): Early Jurassic (Hettangian) China. Known from a partial jaw. Possibly the oldest known therizinosaur. May actually be a basal sauropodomorph.
-Falcarius (2005): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) U.S.A. The most basal known therizinosaur. Possessed several basal features such as possible omnivory, a forward-pointing pubis, and long legs with three-toed feet. Known from a mass accumulation of dozens or hundreds of individuals.
-Jianchangosaurus (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A basal therizinosaur known from a fairly complete juvenile skeleton.
-Martharaptor (2012): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) U.S.A. Known from some limb bones, vertebrae fragments, and a few other parts. May be some other type of maniraptor.
-Nanshiungosaurus (1974): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Initially described as a sauropod.
-Neimongosaurus (2001): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Had a long neck and a deep jaw.
-Nothronychus (2001): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) U.S.A. The first therizinosaur known from North America. Two species have been described, N. mckinleyi and N. graffami.
-Segnosaurus (1979): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Mongolia. Initially thought to be a fish-eating theropod.
-Suzhousaurus (2007): Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) China. May be closely related to Nothronychus.
-Therizinosaurus (1954): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Initially thought to be a giant testudine-like reptile. The largest known therizinosaur, possibly nearing ten meters long and more than three meters tall at the hip. Known from only limb bones, including its large powerful arms with long claws. Each claw may have been almost a meter long in life.

Alvarezsaurs
-Achillesaurus (2007): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Argentina. A large alvarezsaurid. May be the same as Alvarezsaurus.
-Albertonykus (2009): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Canada. The first North American alvarezsaurid to be named. Found in an Albertosaurus bonebed. May have fed on wood-eating termitoids.
-Albinykus (2011): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) Mongolia. Was discovered in a sitting position.
-Alnashetri (2012): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) Argentina. Known from hind limbs. May be some other type of coelurosaur.
-Alvarezsaurus (1991): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Argentina. Initially thought to be a ceratosaur.
-Bonapartenykus (2012): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina. The first alvarezsaur found with associated eggs. Closely related to Patagonykus. The largest known alvarezsaur, at two and a half meters long.
-Bradycneme (1975): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Romania. Initially thought to be an strigiform, and also bears some similarity to troodonts. May be a different kind of maniraptor.
-Ceratonykus (2009): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Had strange spurs on its hands.
-Haplocheirus (2010): Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) China. The earliest and most basal known alvarezsaur. Its basal features include a hand with three functional fingers (with a large thumb claw) and several large teeth. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been nocturnal.
-Heptasteornis (1975): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Romania. Initially thought to be an strigiform.
-Kol (2009): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. A large alvarezsaurid. Its name means "foot" in Mongolian, based on the fact that it's only known from a foot. May be a different kind of maniraptor.
-Linhenykus (2011): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. Had only one finger on each hand. (Most other alvarezsaurids still had the vestiges of the second and third fingers.)
-Mononykus (1993): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Mongolia. First discovered in the 1920s, but wasn't described until the 1990s. The first alvarezsaurid known from fairly complete remains. Initially thought to be an avialan. Was initially named "Mononychus", but that's actually the name of a coleopteran.
-Parvicursor (1996): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. A very small alvarezsaurid, probably just thirty centimeters long.
-Patagonykus (1997): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian) Argentina. A transitional form between basal alvarezsaurids and parvicursorines.
-Shuvuuia (1998): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from several excellent fossils. The first alvarezsaurid found with preserved feathers.
-Xixianykus (2010): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) China. Had very long legs in relation to body size and so was probably very fast even for an alvarezsaur.

Oviraptorosaurs
-Ajancingenia (2013): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Had unusually large thumb claws and a very small crest. Not named after the InGen company from the Jurassic Park franchise. Was initially named "Ingenia" in 1981, but that's actually the name of a nematode.
-Anzu (2014): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. The largest known oviraptorosaur in North America and the most completely known caenagnathid. Had a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians.
-Apatoraptor (2016): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. Known from a partial skeleton. Quill knobs have been identified on its ulna.
-Avimimus (1981): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) China and Mongolia. Had a strange combination of features such as a long neck, a short tail, long legs, and fused fingers. The first non-avialan dinosaur found with evidence of feathers, in the form of a ridge on the ulna that may have been an attachment point for feathers. Trackways and at least one bonebed suggest that it may have been a gregarious animal.
-Banji (2010): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a subadult skull. Had strange ridges on its crest, which may indicate a keratinous sheath. May have been more carnivorous compared to contemporary oviraptorosaurs.
-Beibeilong (2017): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) China. Known from a large embryo and eggs.
-Caenagnathasia (1993): Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Campanian) China and Uzbekistan. Known from toothless jaws and other fragments.
-Caenagnathus (1940): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. A large caenagnathid. Once thought to be the same as Chirostenotes, but some remains do appear to be from a distinct animal. "Macrophalangia", an earlier-named caenagnathid known from a foot, may be the same as this genus.
-Calamospondylus (1866): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.K. Known from only isolated vertebrae.
-Caudipteryx (1998): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Very common in one specific region of the Yixian Formation. Had only two functional fingers. Its fossilized feathers appear to show a barred pattern on its tail frond. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had black body feathers. Two species have been named, C. zoui and C. dongi. C. zoui appears to lack secondary feathers.
-Chirostenotes (1924): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. The first oviraptorosaur known from North America. It's been suggested that it used its second finger for probing crevices in search of food, but if it had primary feathers like other aviremigians this wouldn't have been feasible.
-Citipati (2001): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from several complete skeletons, including individuals brooding their nests. Had a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians. Often mislabeled "Oviraptor" in many restorations.
-Conchoraptor (1986): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Had a very small crest and a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians. Its name means "shellfish thief", based on the idea that it may have fed on the small bivalves that were found in the same deposits.
-Elmisaurus (1981): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Canada, Mongolia, and U.S.A. Closely related to Chirostenotes.
-Epichirostenotes (2011): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. Once thought to be a specimen of Chirostenotes.
-Ganzhousaurus (2013): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a partial skeleton. May have been more herbivorous compared to contemporary oviraptorosaurs.
-Gigantoraptor (2007): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. The largest known oviraptorosaur, being almost nine meters long. Had the longest legs of any theropod. Giant theropod nests found in China and Mongolia may belong to this taxon. It grew faster than similarly-sized tyrannosaurids did.
-Hagryphus (2005): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) U.S.A. A large oviraptorosaur known from forelimb bones.
-Heyuannia (2002): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from several excellent fossils.
-Huanansaurus (2015): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a partial skeleton with a nearly complete skull. Probably closely related to Citipati.
-Incisivosaurus (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had long front teeth akin to incisors with small peg-shaped teeth behind. Probably the same as Protarchaeopteryx.
-Jiangxisaurus (2013): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a partial skeleton of a non-adult individual. May have been more herbivorous compared to contemporary oviraptorosaurs. Possibly the same as Ganzhousaurus.
-Khaan (2001): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from several complete skeletons. Probably closely related to Conchoraptor.
-Leptorhynchos (2013): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada and U.S.A. Once thought to be a species of Chirostenotes. Two species have been named, L. gaddisi and L. elegans.
-Luoyanggia (2009): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) China. A basal, early oviraptorid.
-Machairasaurus (2010): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) China. Known from a partial forelimb and hand. An oviraptorosaur specimen preserved on its nest has been referred to this taxon. Had weakly-curved claws, suggesting herbivory.
-Microvenator (1970): Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) U.S.A. The teeth of Deinonychus were once thought to belong to this taxon.
-Nankangia (2013): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a lower jaw, vertebrae, and limb bones. May have been more herbivorous compared to contemporary oviraptorosaurs.
-Nemegtomaia (2005): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Was initially named "Nemegtia", but that's actually the name of a crustacean. Had a very tall crest. One known specimen has been preserved on its nest.
-Ningyuansaurus (2012): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had more teeth than other basal oviraptorosaurs. Known to have eaten seeds.
-Nomingia (2000): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. The first oviraptorosaur found to have had a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians.
-Ojoraptorsaurus (2011): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Known from pubic bones.
-Oviraptor (1924): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. The holotype was found on a nest of eggs mistakenly thought to have belonged to Protoceratops, giving this taxon a reputation as an "egg thief", which its name translates to. Stomach contents show it ate squamates.
-Protarchaeopteryx (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The first oviraptorosaur found with preserved feathers.
-Rinchenia (1997): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Had the tallest crest known of any oviraptorid. Once thought to be a species of Oviraptor.
-Shanyangosaurus (1996): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Known from a poorly preserved, incomplete skeleton. May be a different kind of maniraptor.
-Shixinggia (2005): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) China. Had strange openings in the leg bones.
-Similicaudipteryx (2008): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had a pygostyle that was independently evolved from those of pygostylians. Juvenile and half-grown specimens preserved with feathers show possible growth stages and feather development. The youngest specimen lacks secondaries.
-Tongtianlong (2016): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) China. Known from a nearly complete specimen.
-Wulatelong (2013): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. The second toe of the holotype is preserved in a retracted posture.
-Yulong (2013): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. Known only from juvenile specimens.

Dromaeosaurids*
-Acheroraptor (2013): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. A North American velociraptorine.
-Achillobator (1999): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Mongolia. One of the largest dromaeosaurids. Had very short legs.
-Adasaurus (1983): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Known from the partial skeleton of an old individual.
-Atrociraptor (2004): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrchtian) Canada. Had a very deep snout.
-Austroraptor (2009): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina. A very large unenlagiine with unusually short arms. Its skull was similar in shape to that of a spinosaurid.
-Bambiraptor (2000): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) U.S.A. Known from a half-grown partial skeleton. Could grasp objects one-handed between the thumb and third finger. May be a North American microraptorian, or the same as Saurornitholestes. Once thought to be a North American specimen of Velociraptor.
-Boreonykus (2015): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. A North American velociraptorine. May be some other type of coelurosaur.
-Buitreraptor (2005): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Argentina. The most completely known unenlagiine. Had a very long snout and very long arms.
-Changyuraptor (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A fairly large microraptorian. Its rectrices were the longest known feathers of any Mesozoic dinosaur.
-Dakotaraptor (2015): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. A large dromaeosaurid. Quill knobs have been identified on its ulna.
-Deinonychus (1969): Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) U.S.A. The dinosaur that inspired the "Dinosaur Renaissance". Multiple specimens have ben found in association with Tenontosaurus, suggesting that it often fed on this herbivore. This is often considered evidence for group hunting in this taxon, but this is debatable. Juveniles had more recurved claws. A possible egg is known.
-Dromaeosauroides (2003): Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) Denmark. Known only from a tooth.
-Dromaeosaurus (1922): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada and U.S.A. Had very powerful jaws. Was initially thought to be a small tyrannosauroid.
-Graciliraptor (2004): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. A microraptorian known from only partial remains.
-Hesperonychus (2009): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada. The first North American microraptorian to be described (except possibly Bambiraptor). Also the youngest known microraptorian. Known from a pelvis found back in 1982 as well as other possible bits and pieces.
-Itemirus (1976): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Once thought to be a tyrannosauroid. Possible remains suggest it may have been comparable in size to Utahraptor.
-Linheraptor (2010): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. Known from a nearly complete, articulated skeleton. Closely related to and probably the same as Tsaagan.
-Luanchuanraptor (2007): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. The first Chinese dromaeosaurid known from outside of the Gobi Desert and the northeastern region.
-Mahakala (2007): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. A very small, flightless basal dromaeosaurid. Known from a partial specimen discovered in 1992.
-Microraptor (2000): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A small, common microraptorian. Had very long foot feathers, suggesting that it used a method of flight unknown in any modern animal. Thought to have had a feathered crest on its head, but this is likely a taphonomic artifact. The back half of a specimen of this taxon was once combined with the front half of a specimen of Yanornis to create the infamous "Archaeoraptor" hoax. Stomach contents show that it ate enantiornithine avialans and fish. Analysis of melanosomes preserved in its feathers shows that it probably had iridescent plumage. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been nocturnal, but the fact that few nocturnal birds are known to have iridescent plumage casts doubt on this. At least one specimen preserves a pair of long tail feathers at the tip of its tail frond. Includes "Cryptovolans".
-Neuquenraptor (2005): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian) Argentina. Probably the same as Unenlagia.
-Ornithodesmus (1887): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.K. Known only from hip vertebrae. Initially thought to be a pterosaur.
-Pamparaptor (2011): Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Coniacian) Argentina. Once thought to be a juvenile Buitreraptor. Known from a troodont-like foot, but is possibly a basal dromaeosaurid.
-Pyroraptor (2000): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) France. Its name means "fire thief", based on the fact that its remains were found after a forest fire. Probably the same as Variraptor.
-Saurornitholestes (1978): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Canada and U.S.A. A tooth embedded in a pterosaur arm bone and feeding traces on an ornithomimid tail bone show that it fed on (presumably already dead) azhdarchid pterosaurs and ornithomimids. A partial specimen with tooth marks suggests that it may have been eaten by tyrannosaurids.
-Shanag (2007): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Barremian) Mongolia. A very small dromaeosaurid. May be a microraptorian or a northern unenlagiine.
-Sinornithosaurus (1999): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The first dromaeosaurid found with preserved feathers. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been cathemeral. Remains have been found as gut contents of Sinocalliopteryx.
-Tianyuraptor (2010): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. A large, short-armed possible microraptorian. May be a transitional form between basal dromaeosaurids and eudromaeosaurs.
-Tsaagan (2006): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from a well-preserved skull and some neck vertebrae. Had a strong snout for a velociraptorine.
-Unenlagia (1997): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian) Argentina. May have had a greater range of mobility at the shoulder joint than other dromaeosaurids. Two species have been named, U. comahuensis and U. paynemili.
-Utahraptor (1993): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) U.S.A. The largest known dromaeosaurid, at around seven meters long.
-Variraptor (1998): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) France. Known only from very fragmentary and possibly chimeric material.
-Velociraptor (1924): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China and Mongolia. Known from many excellent fossils, including one locked in combat with a Protoceratops. Feeding traces and gut contents show that it scavenged on the remains of Protoceratops and azhdarchid pterosaurs. Quill knobs have been identified on its ulna. Juveniles had more recurved claws. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been nocturnal. Two species have been named, V. mongoliensis and V. osmolskae.
-Yurgovuchia (2012): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.S.A. Similar in some ways to Utahraptor, but much smaller. Had a fairly flexible tail.
-Zhenyuanlong (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known to have had large wings despite its short arms.
-Zhongjianosaurus (2017): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A very small microraptorian.

*Microraptorians and unenlagiines may be avialans.

Troodonts
-Archaeornithoides (1992): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from a juvenile skull that appears to have been fed on by a deltatheridiid mammal. Once thought to represent a hatchling Tarbosaurus.
-Borogovia (1987): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Had highly reduced killing claws.
-Byronosaurus (2000): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. The skulls of two hatchlings have been found in an oviraptorid nest.
-Daliansaurus (2017): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton. Had a large claw on the fourth toe, similar in size to its killing claw.
-Elopteryx (1913): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Romania. Was initially thought to be a dromaeosaurid, but is probably a troodont.
-Geminiraptor (2010): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.S.A. The first North American Early Cretaceous troodont described.
-Gobivenator (2014): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from a nearly complete specimen.
-Jianianhualong (2017): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A transitional form between basal and later troodonts. The first troodont found with definite evidence of asymmetric feathers.
-Jinfengopteryx (2005): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known to have eaten seeds. May be some other type of paravian.
-Koparion (1994): Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) U.S.A. Known only from teeth.
-Liaoningvenator (2017): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Linhevenator (2011): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. A derived troodont with extremely short but powerful arms. Had large killing claws for a troodont.
-Mei (2004): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. Its name means "sleeping" in Chinese, based on the fact that the holotype is a complete skeleton preserved in a sleeping position.
-Pectinodon (1982): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Known mostly from teeth. Once thought to be the same as Troodon.
-Philovenator (2012): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) China. Once thought to be a juvenile of Saurornithoides. Had reduced killing claws.
-Saurornithoides (1924): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Closely related to Troodon.
-Sinornithoides (1994): Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) China. Known from a nearly complete fossil in a sleeping position.
-Sinovenator (2002): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. Had a backwards-pointing pubis a la dromaeosaurids, indicating that forward-pointing pubes in later troodonts were reversals.
-Sinusonasus (2004): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. Its name means "curved nose", based on the fact that it had curved snout bones. May be the same as Sinovenator.
-Talos (2011): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) U.S.A. The holotype shows signs of a healed injury to the left killing claw, supporting the idea that troodonts used the second toe claw as a weapon.
-Tochisaurus (1991): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Known from only a foot. Probably had reduced killing claws.
-Troodon (1856): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Canada and U.S.A. Once thought to be a squamate, pachycephalosaur, or ornithopod. Juveniles had very long legs even for troodonts. Several nests are known. The size and wear patterns of Alaskan Troodon teeth indicate that northern populations may have been larger and more predatory than southern ones. Likely an overlumped taxon that may be split into several distinct taxa in the future.
-Urbacodon (2007): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Uzebekistan. Known from teeth and jaws. Its name stands for the Uzbek/Russian/British/American/Canadian joint paleontological expeditions.
-Xixiasaurus (2010): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Campanian) China. May be closely related to Urbacodon.
-Zanabazar (2009): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Once thought to be a species of Saurornithoides.

Avebrevicaudans
-Abavornis (1998): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from partial shoulder bones.
-Aberratiodontus (2004): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Initially thought to be an enantiornithine, but is probably a yanornithiform.
-Alamitornis (2009): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina. Possibly closely related to Patagopteryx. May actually be a squamate.
-Alethoalaornis (2007): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had a long, pointed snout.
-Alexornis (1976): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mexico. A passerid-sized enantiornithine.
-Ambiortus (1982): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Barremian) Mongolia. A euornithine with a mix of basal and derived characteristics.
-Anatalavis (1987): Late Cretaceous to Eocene (Maastrichtian-Ypresian) U.K. and U.S.A. An early anseriform. Two species have been named, A. oxfordi and A. rex, the latter of which was once thought to be a species of Telmatornis.
-Apatornis (1873): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Campanian) U.S.A. Once thought to be a species of Ichthyornis, but is probably a neornithine.
-Apsaravis (2001): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) Mongolia. Known from a nearly complete skeleton lacking a skull. Probably spent a lot of time on the ground.
-Archaeorhynchus (2006): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had a toothless bill with a rounded lower jaw tip. All known specimens have been found with gizzard stones.
-Archaeornithura (2015): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) China. The oldest known euornithine. A hongshanornithid known from excellent specimens.
-Asiahesperornis (1991): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Kazakhstan. Known only from vertebrae and leg bones.
-Austinornis (1999): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Santonian) U.S.A. Possibly an early galliform.
-Avisaurus (1985): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) U.S.A. A large, carnivorous enantiornithine. Two species have been named, A. archibaldi and A. gloriae.
-Baptornis (1877): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Campanian) U.S.A. A nearly complete skeleton is known. Includes "Parascaniornis".
-Bauxitornis (2010): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Hungary. Described as a large avisaurid, though possibly some other type of maniraptor.
-Bellulornis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A euornithine known from a mostly complete skeleton lacking a skull. Was initially named "Bellulia", but that's actually the name of a lepidopteran.
-Bohaiornis (2011): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from good specimens. Suggested to have had a raptorial lifestyle. Similar to, and may be the same as, Eoenantiornis.
-Boluochia (1995): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A longipterygid initially thought to have had a hooked beak, but this was a misinterpretation and it's now known to be have had large, curved teeth instead.
-Brodavis (2012): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Canada, Mongolia, and U.S.A. A hesperornithine known from freshwater deposits. May have been volant. Probably stayed near the water surface. Four species have been named, B. americanus, B. baileyi, B. mongoliensis, and B. varneri, the last of which was once considered a species of Baptornis.
-Canadaga (1999): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Canada. The youngest and largest known hesperornithine.
-Catenoleimus (1998): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from a badly-preserved shoulder bone.
-Cathayornis (1992): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Once thought to be synonymous with Sinornis.
-Ceramornis (1963): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Known from only a shoulder bone. Probably a neornithine.
-Cerebavis (2006): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Russia. Known from only an endocast of the brain.
-Changchengornis (1999): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Named after the Great Wall of China. Known to have had a feathered crest and a hooked bill. Closely related to Confuciusornis.
-Changmaornis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from leg and hip bones.
-Changzuiornis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A long-snouted euornithine. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had black wing and tail feathers.
-Chaoyangia (1993): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Some remains of this taxon have been reassigned to Songlingornis.
-Chiappeavis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The only enantiornithine known to have had a tail fan similar to those of euornithines.
-Cimolopteryx (1890): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Canada and U.S.A. Possibly an early charadriiform. Two valid species have been named, C. rara and C. maxima.
-Concornis (1992): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) Spain. May have been a wading avisaurid.
-Confuciusornis (1995): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The most common known Mesozoic dinosaur, known from hundreds or thousands of specimens. Known to have eaten fish. Some individuals have been found with a pair of ribbon-shaped tail feathers preserved while others lack them, representing sexual dimorphism. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been diurnal. Remains have been found as gut contents of Sinocalliopteryx. Four species have been named, C. sanctus, C. dui, C. feducciai, and C. jianchangensis, although the last may actually represent a separate genus.
-Cratoavis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Brazil. An enantiornithine known from a small, well-preserved specimen with very long, striped rectrices.
-Cruralispennia (2017): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) China. An enantiornithine with an unusually short pygostyle. Had strange wire-shaped feathers on its legs and wings. Grew rapidly for an enantiornithine, nearing adult size within a year.
-Cuspirostrisornis (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Had very large talons. Probably an avisaurid.
-Dalingheornis (2006): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Reported to have had heterodactyl feet that evolved independently from that of trogoniforms, but this may be an artifact of preservation. May have been good at climbing. Had a longer tail than other enantiornithines did, though this is probably a juvenile characteristic. Possibly the juvenile of another known genus.
-Dapingfangornis (2006): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Preserves a horn on the snout that is probably either an artifact of preservation or a sideways-projecting bone that was likely obscured by feathers in life.
-Dingavis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A long-snouted, toothless euornithine.
-Dunhuangia (2015) Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a partial skeleton.
-Elbretornis (2010): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Argentina. An enantiornithine with very hollow arm bones. May be the same as Lectavis or Yungavolucris.
-Elsornis (2007): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) Mongolia. A flightless or near-flightless enantiornithine.
-Enaliornis (1876): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) U.K. Probably a basal, flying hesperornithine. Three species have been named, E. barretti, E. sedgwicki, and E. seeleyi.
-Enantiophoenix (2008): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Lebanon. One of the first dinosaur fossils found in Lebanon. Stomach contents show it may have eaten tree sap.
-Enantiornis (1981): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Argentina. A large enantiornithine.
-Eoalulavis (1996): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) Spain. The oldest known maniraptor with an alula at the time of its discovery. Stomach contents show that it may have eaten aquatic crustaceans.
-Eocathayornis (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. In spite of its name, it may not be closely related to Cathayornis.
-Eoconfuciusornis (2008): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) China. An early confuciusornithiform. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have been mostly black, with a gray head and legs and a brown throat patch.
-Eoenantiornis (1999): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A small enantiornithine with a short, blunt snout.
-Eopengornis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) China. A basal enantiornithine with a pair of fully pennaceous rectrices, suggesting that the ribbon-like morphology found in the rectrices of other enantiornithines was modified from fully pennaceous feathers.
-Evgenavis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) Russia. Known from the tarsometatarsus. Had features similar to both ornithothoracines and confuciusornithiforms.
-Explorornis (1998): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Two species have been named, E. nessovi and E. walkeri, the latter of which was once thought to be a species of Enantiornis.
-Feitianius (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with ornamental tail plumage formed from three feather morphotypes.
-Flexomornis (2010): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) U.S.A. A seagoing enantiornithine. One of the oldest known flying avialans of North America.
-Fortunguavis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with stout feet and strongly recurved claws. May have been a trunk climber.
-Fumicollis (2015): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Campanian) U.S.A. A small hesperornithine known from a partial skeleton. Gut contents show it ate fish.
-Gallornis (1931): Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Hauterivian) France. Known only from fragmented limb bones.
-Gansus (1984): Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) China. A foot-propelled diving avialan. Known from many good skeletons, including some with integument preserved. Plumage was probably dark colored.
-Gargantuavis (1998): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) France and Spain. One of the largest Mesozoic avialans. May be closely related to Patagopteryx. Fossil eggs found in France may belong to this taxon.
-Gobipipus (2013): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known only from embryos.
-Gobipteryx (1976): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) Mongolia. One of the few enantiornithines known to have had toothless jaws. Possible eggs are known.
-Grabauornis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete specimen.
-Gracilornis (2011): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A slender enantiornithine. Known from a complete skeleton.
-Graculavus (1872): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. A large, Meleagris-sized neornithine. Two species have been named, G. velox and G. augustus.
-Guildavis (2004): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Santonian) U.S.A. Once thought to be a species of Ichthyornis.
-Gurilynia (1999): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. A large enantiornithine.
-Halimornis (2002): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) U.S.A. A seagoing avisaurid.
-Hesperornis (1872): Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) Canada, Russia, and U.S.A. Known from many excellent fossils from both marine and freshwater deposits. Remains have been found as gut contents of Tylosaurus and one individual possesses healed bite marks made by a polycotylid plesiosaur. Likely a deep-diving taxon with lobed feet. Eleven species have been named, H. regalis, H. altus, H. bairdi, H. chowi, H. crassipes, H. gracilis, H. lumgairi, H. macdonaldi, H. mengeli, H. montana, and H. rossicus. Includes "Coniornis".
-Holbotia (2015): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Barremian) Mongolia. May have had a more flexible neck than other enantiornithines.
-Hollanda (2010): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. A Geococcyx-like running ground avialan.
-Hongshanornis (2005): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from complete specimens with preserved feathers. May have had a feathered crest on its head. Likely a wading bird. Known to have eaten seeds.
-Horezmavis (1983): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known from only a foot.
-Houornis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Once thought to be a species of Cathayornis. The holotype is preserved as an impression.
-Hulsanpes (1982): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Mongolia. Known from only a foot. May be some other type of maniraptor.
-Huoshanornis (2010): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine that may have been very agile in flight. Known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Iaceornis (2004): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Campanian) U.S.A. Once thought to be a species of Ichthyornis.
-Iberomesornis (1992): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) Spain. A passerid-sized basal enantiornithine, one of the smallest known Mesozoic dinosaurs.
-Ichthyornis (1872): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Campanian) Canada, Mexico, and U.S.A. A toothed, larid-like seabird. One of the first fossil avialans found in North America.
-Incolornis (1999): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Two species have been named, I. silvae and I. martini, the latter of which was once thought to be a species of Enantiornis.
-Intiornis (2010): Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Argentina. A passerid-sized avisaurid that was good at perching. Known only from a foot.
-Iteravis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A very common euornithine with ornamental rectrices.
-Jianchangornis (2009): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete, articulated half grown skeleton. Known to have eaten fish.
-Jibeinia (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Superficially similar to confuciusornithiforms, but is probably an enantiornithine.
-Jinzhouornis (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Two species have been named, J. yixianensis and J. zhangjiyingia. Probably the same as Confuciusornis.
-Jiuquanornis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a sternum, furcula, and ribs.
-Judinornis (1983): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. A freshwater hesperornithine.
-Juehuaornis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A euornithine with a long, hook-tipped snout.
-Kizylkumavis (1984): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from an arm bone.
-Kuszholia (1992): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from several fragmentary parts. May be some other type of maniraptor.
-Lamarqueavis (2010): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina and U.S.A. Includes specimens once thought to be species of Cimolopteryx.
-Laornis (1870): Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Maastrichtian-Danian) U.S.A. A wading neornithine.
-Largirostrornis (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A large, long-snouted enantiornithine.
-Lectavis (1993): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Argentina. A ground-dwelling enantiornithine. Known only from hind limbs. May be the same as Enantiornis.
-Lenesornis (1986): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from hip vertebrae.
-Liaoningornis (1996): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with a large breastbone and good perching ability. Once thought to be a euornithine.
-Liaoxiornis (1999): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a juvenile with mature flight feathers. Very likely the juvenile of another known genus.
-Limenavis (2001): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina. Known from only a few fragmented forelimb bones.
-Linyiornis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton with preserved ovarian follicles.
-Lonchodytes (1963): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Known only from foot bones. Possibly a procellariiform.
-Longchengornis (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a good specimen but not well studied.
-Longicrusavis (2010): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. A close relative of Hongshanornis. Had long legs.
-Longipteryx (2001): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A long-snouted enantiornithine that was good at perching and may have caught fish or hunted insects in trees.
-Longirostravis (2004): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A long-snouted longipterygid that may have been a mud prober or an arboreal insectivore.
-Longusunguis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Closely related to Bohaiornis.
-Martinavis (2007): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Argentina, France, and U.S.A. Extremely widespread, but probably an overlumped taxon. May be the same as Soroavisaurus. Five species have been named, M. cruzyensis, M. vincei, M. saltariensis, M. minor, and M. whetstonei.
-Monoenantiornis (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete subadult specimen.
-Mystiornis (2011): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) Russia. A diving avialan. May be an avisaurid.
-Nanantius (1986): Early Cretaceous (Albian) Australia. Possible remains have been found in Mongolia but probably belong to a different taxon, such as Gobipteryx.
-Neogaeornis (1929): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Chile. Probably some kind of seagoing neornithine. One of the first Cretaceous avialans found in South America.
-Neuquenornis (1994): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Argentina. Eggs with embryos that may belong to this taxon are known.
-Noguerornis (1989): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) Spain. Known from a partial skeleton with preserved feathers.
-Novacaesareala (2002): Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Maastrichtian-Danian) U.S.A. Possibly closely related to Torotix.
-Omnivoropteryx (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Probably the same as Sapeornis.
-Otogornis (1994): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from only forelimb bones with preserved feathers.
-Palaeotringa (1870): Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Maastrichtian-Danian) U.S.A. Known only from several isolated bones. Probably a neornithine. Two species have been named, P. littoralis and P. vagans.
-Palintropus (1970): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Canada and U.S.A. Once thought to be an early galliform, but is probably closer to Apsaravis.
-Parabohaiornis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Closely related to Bohaiornis.
-Parahesperornis (1984): Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Santonian) U.S.A. A nearly complete skeleton with feather impressions is known. Likely had lobed feet.
-Parahongshanornis (2011): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton lacking a skull.
-Parapengornis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with fully pennaceous rectrices. Possibly specialized for trunk-climbing.
-Paraprotopteryx (2007): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. The first enantiornithine to be found with four ribbon-shaped tail feathers preserved.
-Parvavis (2014): Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Santonian) China. Known from a subadult specimen. One of the smallest known Mesozoic dinosaurs, even taking into account potential adult size.
-Pasquiaornis (1997): Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Canada. A hesperornithine possibly capable of flying and waddling. May have been a surface swimmer. Known from only leg bones and a skull bone. Two species have been named, P. hardiei and P. tankei.
-Patagopteryx (1992): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Argentina. Known from a nearly complete skeleton but not a complete skull. A flightless euornithine. Had a forward-pointing first toe and short feet.
-Pengornis (2008): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. One of the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithines. Had small blunt teeth.
-Piscivoravis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known to have eaten fish. Had several unusual features for an ornithuromorph, such as a large thumb claw.
-Piscivorenantiornis (2017): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A fish-eating enantiornithine.
-Platanavis (1992): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from hip vertebrae.
-Polarornis (2002): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Antarctica. Possibly an early gaviiform. May have been flightless or nearly so. Possibly the same as Neogaeornis.
-Potamornis (2000): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. A freshwater hesperornithine.
-Protopteryx (2000): Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) China. One of the oldest known enantiornithines. Had short, broad wings.
-Pterygornis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A small enantiornithine known from a disarticulated skeleton.
-Qiliania (2011): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from well-preserved hip and leg bones.
-Rapaxavis (2009): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A longipterygid suggested to have been good at perching and mud probing. Known from a complete skeleton. The feet may have been pamprodactyl.
-Sapeornis (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A large omnivoropterygid with free fingers, long foot feathers, and very long wings. Its name stands for the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution. Known to have eaten seeds. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been diurnal. Includes "Didactylornis" and "Shenshiornis".
-Sazavis (1989): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from a leg bone fragment.
-Schizooura (2012): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A fork-tailed, toothless basal euornithine.
-Shanweiniao (2010): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. Its name means "fan-tailed bird" in Chinese, based on the fact that it was found with four to six ribbon-shaped tail feathers preserved instead of two, which it may have used as a tail fan analogous to those of euornithines.
-Shengjingornis (2012): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with a downcurved snout. Possibly a longipterygid.
-Shenqiornis (2010): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine found with a well-preserved skull. Had bulb-shaped teeth that indicate it may have fed on hard, durable food items.
-Sinornis (1992): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a nearly complete fossil.
-Songlingornis (1997): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Probably a yanornithiform.
-Soroavisaurus (1993): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Argentina. Once thought to be a species of Avisaurus.
-Sulcavis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A durophagous enantiornithine.
-Telmatornis (1870): Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Maastrichtian-Danian) U.S.A. Possibly an early charadriiform.
-Teviornis (2002): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Mongolia. Probably a presbyornithid anseriform.
-Tianyuornis (2014): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A hongshanornithid known from a subadult specimen.
-Tingmiatornis (2016): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Canada. A large diving euornithine.
-Torotix (1963): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Although its name means "flamingo", it's possibly an aequornithine.
-Tytthostonyx (1987): Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Maastrichtian-Danian) U.S.A. Possibly a procellariiform.
-Vegavis (2005): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Antarctica. An early diving anseriform. One specimen has a preserved syrinx.
-Vescornis (2004): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Was briefly described in 1999 as "Hebeiornis", but this name isn't thought to be valid by most researchers. May be the adult of Jibeinia.
-Volgavis (1989): Late Cretaceous (Maastrchtian) Russia. Probably an early pelecanid-like seabird.
-Vorona (1996): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Madagascar. Known only from leg bones.
-Wyleyia (1973): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.K. May be some other type of maniraptor.
-Xiangornis (2012): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. An enantiornithine with a carpometatarsus similar in structure to those of ornithuromorphs.
-Xinghaiornis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A toothless ornithothoracine probably specialized for mud probing.
-Yanornis (2001): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A fish-eating euornithine. The front half of a specimen of this taxon was once combined with the back half of a specimen of Microraptor to create the infamous "Archaeoraptor" hoax. The most basal known avialan found with extensive foot scales. Two species have been named, Y. martini and Y. guozhangi.
-Yixianornis (2001): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Probably closely related to Yanornis. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been diurnal.
-Yuanjiawaornis (2015): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A large enantiornithine.
-Yumenornis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Known from a complete forelimb and associated parts.
-Yungavolucris (1993): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Argentina. May have been a swimming enantiornithine.
-Zhongjianornis (2010): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Described as an extremely basal, toothless avialan. May actually be a euornithine.
-Zhongornis (2008): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) China. Known from a hatchling, perhaps a confuciusornithiform. Had a short tail but no pygostyle.
-Zhouornis (2013): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A fairly large enantiornithine.
-Zhyraornis (1992): Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from vertebrae.

Indeterminate/Miscellaneous maniraptors
-Anchiornis (2009): Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) China. May be either a deinonychosaur or an avialan. It had long foot feathers, suggesting that this trait is basal to eumaniraptors. It also had feathered toes. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had a mostly black and dark gray body with an orange crown and black-and-white wing feathers.
-Archaeopteryx (1861): Late Jurassic (Tithonian) Germany. Known from several excellent fossils. Had long feathers on its legs, though not as extensive as those of Anchiornis or Microraptor. Analysis of the wing feathers show that they may have been black tipped. The size and shape of its sclerotic ring suggest it may have been diurnal. May be an avialan, deinonychosaur, or basal paravian.
-Aurornis (2013): Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) China. Described as one of the earliest and most basal avialans known. May be the same as Anchiornis.
-Balaur (2010): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Romania. A robust paravian with an enlarged first toe and just two functional fingers. May be either a dromaeosaurid or an avialan.
-Chongmingia (2016): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A basal avialan known from a partial skeleton. May be closely related to ornithothoracines.
-Dalianraptor (2005): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. A flightless avialan. May be some other type of maniraptor. Likely based on a chimeric specimen.
-Eosinopteryx (2013): Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) China. A basal paravian that appears to have lacked pennaceous rectrices.
-Epidexipteryx (2008): Middle Jurassic (Callovian) China. Had a short snout, large protruding teeth, and a short tail. Was found with four long ribbon-shaped tail feathers preserved. May be the adult of Scansoriopteryx. May be an avialan.
-Euronychodon (1991): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Portugal. Known only from teeth that may belong to a deinonychosaur.
-Fukuivenator (2016): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) Japan. Had an unusual combination of features of both derived maniraptors and more basal coelurosaurs. Its heterodont dentition is suggestive of omnivory. May be some other type of coelurosaur.
-Jeholornis (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. One of the largest Early Cretaceous avialans. Known to have eaten seeds. Had a retractable second toe and a first toe that wasn't fully reversed. Its tail feathers were frond-like and probably used in display. It also had modified tail coverts that formed a fan-shaped structure. Three species have been named, J. prima, J. curvipes, and J. palmapenis. Includes "Shenzhouraptor".
-Jixiangornis (2002): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) China. Possibly the same as Jeholornis.
-Kakuru (1980): Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Australia. Known from only some limb bones that may belong to an oviraptorosaur. May be an abelisauroid.
-Nuthetes (1854): Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) U.K. May be a dromaeosaurid.
-Paronychodon (1876): Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) U.S.A. Known only from teeth.
-Pedopenna (2005): Middle Jurassic (Callovian) China. A paravian known only from a hind limb with plumulaceous foot feathers preserved.
-Pneumatoraptor (2010): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Hungary. A small paravian with very hollow bones.
-Rahonavis (1998): Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Madagascar. A small, flying unenlagiine or basal avialan. Quill knobs have been identified on its ulna. Was initially named "Rahona", but that's actually the name of a lepidopteran.
-Scansoriopteryx (2002): Middle Jurassic (Callovian) China. Known from two juvenile specimens. Had an extremely long third finger and may have climbed trees. Includes "Epidendrosaurus". May be an avialan.
-Wellnhoferia (2001): Late Jurassic (Tithonian) Germany. Probably the same as Archaeopteryx. May be an avialan, deinonychosaur, or basal paravian.
-Xiaotingia (2011): Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) China. Had blunt, bulbous teeth. May be a deinonychosaur or avialan.
-Yandangornis (1999): Late Cretaceous (Santonian) China. A toothless basal avialan with long legs. May be a different kind of maniraptor.
-Yaverlandia (1971): Early Cretaceous (Barremian) U.K. Known only from the top of a skull. Initially thought to be a pachycephalosaur.
-Yi (2015): Middle-Late Jurassic (Callovian-Oxfordian) China. A scansoriopterygid known to have had an unusual styliform bone jutting from each forelimb and extensive patagia, forming membranous wings. Analysis of melanosomes preserved in its feathers shows that it probably had darker feathers on the top of its head.
-Yixianosaurus (2003): Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) China. Known only from forelimb material with preserved feathers. Had very long hands. May be a paravian.

70 comments:

  1. Ilerdopteryx

    Praeornis

    Thecocoelurus

    Richardoestesia

    Pectinodon

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  2. Thanks. I'm leaving out Praeornis as it's dubious, and provisionally keeping Pectinodon in Troodon. I intentionally left out Thecocoelurus as I remember reading on Tetrapod Zoology that Naish no longer considers it an oviraptorosaur or therizinosaur, so I'm waiting for further info. I didn't include Richardoestesia because I based much of the phylogenetics on Holtz's winter 2010-2011 dinosaur genus list, where it is only categorized as a basal coelurosaur. I might consider adding Ilerdopteryx.

    ReplyDelete
  3. On second thought, I'll hold off Ilerdopteryx as well, it being non diagnostic.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Greeting Albertonykus

    Parascaniornis stensioei

    Polarornis

    Hebeiornis (Vescornis)

    Anchiornis

    D G Rexisto

    ReplyDelete
  5. Greetings. Thanks for the feedback. I'm keeping Parascaniornis in Baptornis, and Hebeiornis, it appears, isn't "adequately described". Anchiornis is already there. I'll add Polarornis.

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  6. Good job! You deserve points for holding off on Chatterjee's Protoavis!

    Related note: How are we sure that Yaverlandia is a maniraptor and not some other theropod? All we've got is a skull roof!

    "I intentionally left out Thecocoelurus as I remember reading on Tetrapod Zoology that Naish no longer considers it an oviraptorosaur or therizinosaur, so I'm waiting for further info."

    So? He's just one person. Not that he's unreliable in any way, but he's still just one person.

    Not to mention, what you said here about Eshanosaurus was cool. I didn't know that.

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  7. Definitely not touching "Protoavis"! XD

    Yaverlandia as a maniraptor is derived from this analysis: http://jgs.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/165/3/613

    On Thecocoelurus, it's mostly that Naish was the one who initially identified it as a maniraptor to begin with. I think he's said that he now finds that it's an abelisauroid, but wait for the paper, I guess.

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  8. "Reproductive organs may be preserved in one individual."

    Which gender are we talking about, by the way?

    While we're at it, could you please move the scansoriopterygids to the "Indeterminate maniraptors" list? They're still controversial.

    In my previous comment about Yaverlandia, I meant to ask how the study came to the conclusion that it was a maniraptor and not another type of theropod.

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  9. I forgot to mention: Is Eshanosaurus still that old? I recall reading in Dr. Holtz's syllabus that it may be as young as the Early Cretaceous.

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  10. The reproductive organs are those of a male.

    Although I personally expect (or at least wouldn't be surprised if) scansoriopterygids to turn out to be non avialians, most analyses that have included them have resulted in them being avialians, so they will remain there for now. The only recent exception I'm aware of is the Samrukia paper, though I could easily be wrong.

    I don't have the Yaverlandia as maniraptor paper unfortunately, so I don't know which characters resulted in it being a maniraptor.

    The exact age of Eshanosaurus is indeed controversial.

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  11. Struthio

    Corvus

    Pica

    Haliaeetus

    Many other modern birds. :P

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  12. From the introductory paragraph:

    "I hope to include the Cenozoic taxa someday, but for now I'm focusing on the Mesozoic ones."

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  13. Is that because there are too many to list? :P

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  14. Yes. That, and I don't know of any handy databases that have them all compiled (particularly extinct taxa).

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  15. Should Yaverlandia be moved? I read on TetZoo that Naish specifically found it to be troodontid...

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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  16. Nice list! Very handy. I don't have the paper either but here's what TTD says on Yaverlandia...

    "Naish believes it is a theropod, based on bilobed cerebral concavity; narrow olfactory tract; ventrally concave orbital margins; small, closely appressed olfactory bulbs. Indeed, the deep cerebral fossae and posteriorly expanded cerebrum suggest a coelurosaurian identity, while the narrow olfactory lobes are only known in maniraptoriforms. Among maniraptoriforms, Yaverlandia is unlike ornithomimids and dromaeosaurids in having ossified orbitosphenoids."

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  17. Hey, if you update this, could you add who described each maniraptoran?

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    Replies
    1. A pronunciation guide would also be handy, as well as the inclusion of "Ingenia".

      Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    2. Not including non-validly named taxa.

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  18. About Eshanosaurus... I got in touch with Holtz concerning the genus list. He had this to say: "I know the paper [suggesting it's a therizinosaur], and am not impressed."

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants (the previous comment was also mine, but I couldn't sign it for some reason)

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    1. Yes, he told me something similar when I asked him about it last year.

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    2. If I ask him why he's unimpressed, will you remove it?

      SpongeBobFossilPants/Spinosegnosaurus77

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    3. Probably not (I'd rather wait for something to come up in the technical lit before doing that), though I might note that there is doubt on the study's validity.

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  19. About Chirostenotes.. How do we know the feathers didn't run the length of the shorter two fingers, leaving the longer one bare?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    Replies
    1. Remiges attach to the second finger, not any other (except maybe in scansors, but they're weirdos so they get a pass), even if the other fingers are also feathered (as is usually the case, though possibly not for oviraptorosaurs).

      Delete
    2. I wasn't suggesting they didn't attach to the second finger, I suggested that they were shorter than usual.

      Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    3. That's entirely possible, but unless they were as short as penguin wing feathers or something I don't think they would have been conducive to probing.

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  20. Should we move unenlagiines, microraptorines & troodontids to Indeterminate Maniraptors?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    Replies
    1. Although all of those have the potential to jump around the tree, I don't think that's necessary for now.

      Delete
    2. Will you at least note that they may jump around the tree?

      Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    3. If it's recovered seriously by more analyses.

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  21. You should really keep a Thescelosaurus!-like updates list.

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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  22. Wasn't Epidendrosaurus named before Scansoriopteryx?

    -Ornitholestes

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    Replies
    1. And wasn't Shenzouraptor named before Jeholornis?

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    2. Yeah... maybe. It's hard to tell because the two names were published within days of one another. I'm really just following the fact that Jeholornis is currently the favored name in technical literature, but the case has certainly been made for "Shenzhouraptor".

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    3. By any chance, is there any real reason to ignore Mortimer's arguments (and those on Hebeiornis being the correct name for Vescornis)?

      Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    4. As far as I'm aware... no, probably not.

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  23. Mickey Mortimer considers Inosaurus a therizinosaur; will you add it?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    Replies
    1. Maybe if it turns out to be less dubious...

      Delete
  24. It might be a good idea to mention "Macrophalangia" in the comments for Chirostenotes.

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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  25. Mickey Mortimer considers Kuszholia an oviraptorosaur; care to mention that?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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  26. Shouldn't you remove the part about two species of Sinornithosaurus?

    Which sources synonymize Achillesaurus with Alvarezsaurus (other than Paul's 2010 field guide)?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    1. Waiting a bit to see if that conclusion is well supported.

      Achillesaurus being Alvarezsaurus is suggested in the description of Alnashetri.

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  27. Khaan as a juvenile Citipati? Don't tell me you're using Paul's 2010 field guide as a reference!

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    Replies
    1. Only because the possibility is backed up by Martyniuk's guide, if that counts for anything.

      Delete
  28. You do realize that Macrophalangia was named before Caenagnathus, right?

    Also, you forgot Wulatelong.

    SpongeBobFossilPants/Spinosegnosaurus77

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    Replies
    1. I need to reread the Leptorhynchos paper.

      And no, I did not, I just haven't added it.

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    2. Here we go: "No other jaws of Caenagnathus have been identified. CMN 2367, an articulated foot described as “Macrophalangia canadensis,” is usually assumed to be synonymous with Chirostenotes pergracilis, but it has a larger and more robust tarsometatarsus than Chirostenotes, which raises the possibility that it represents the same species as Caenagnathus. “Macrophalangia canadensis” Sternberg 1932 would have priority over Caenagnathus collinsi Sternberg 1940, but at present it is difficult to confidently refer the pes and jaw to the same species. Therefore, for now we prefer to retain the familiar Caenagnathus over the little-used “Macrophalangia.”"

      I'll edit the list to clarify this.

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  29. Replies
    1. Ah, true... anyway, excellent list, I think it can be very useful to those who are beginners.
      I would like to know what you think of a my speculation: Bauxitornis and tarsometatarsus of Balaur share certain traits in common. And if these common traits were synapomorphies? A possible very endemic clade of Avialae just outside Pygostylia including terrestrial and dwarfic taxa as Balaur, Bauxitornis and perhaps other doubts Hateg's maniraptorians, as Bradycneme, Elopteryx, Heptasteornis (these three lack in your list) and Pneumatoraptor: The mysterious Bradycnemidae!

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    2. Very interesting speculation; it wouldn't greatly surprise me if that were true. Better specimens are needed to properly evaluate it, naturally.

      Those three are in the list, though I've put them under more specific categories than perhaps they should be.

      Delete
  30. Nqwebasaurus came out as an alvarezsaur in Lee et al. (2014); will you add it?

    SpongeBobFossilPants/Spinosegnosaurus77

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    1. I'll wait until it starts showing up more consistently as one.

      Delete
  31. Where has synonymy of Incisivosaurus with Protarchaeopteryx been suggested? Mickey Mortimer said in his review of Martyniuk's book that the idea was completely new to him.

    Spinosegmosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    1. The original suggestion was probably that of Senter et al. (2004) "Systematics and evolution of Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda)".

      Delete
  32. Aren't "Palaeopteryx" and "Proornis" nomina nuda?

    Also, do you use [] or <> for italics?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    Replies
    1. That appears to be the case. I'll exclude them for now.

      <> for italics (and other formatting tags).

      Delete
  33. Which analyses (other than the original description) placed Jinfengopteryx as an avialan (without other troodontids following)?

    Has anyone seriously followed Agnolin & Novas (2013) in supporting non-dromaeosaurid Mahakala?

    Wasn't there a recent paper that had Richardoestesia as a dromaeosaurid?

    What led you to remove Unquillosaurus? Was there a followup to Carrano et al. (2012) that I missed?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    1. Non-troodont Jinfengopteryx was also found by Foth et al. (2014) describing the eleventh Archaeopteryx specimen.

      I'm stumped on Mahakala... it doesn't appear to have been any of the usual suspects. The Theropod Database does say that it may be a basal paravian, but doesn't cite a source for it. I may have simply been mistaken in moving it out.

      Richardoestesia I could go either way on.

      With Unquillosaurus, I probably eventually decided on Carrano et al. (2012) being sufficient to justify removal until further notice. (It was a while ago.) I was likely also influenced by other sites (mostly Thescelosaurus!) that started including it among carnosaurs instead.

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    2. I thought Jinfengopteryx was found to be a basal paravian, not an avialan.

      Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    3. I misread your first comment. Yes, you're correct on that count.

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  34. Surely "Dalianraptor" isn't an avebrevicaudan… is it?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    1. Forgot I still had it up there! Correct, it wouldn't be... if it's real.

      Delete
  35. Didn't Kurochkin (2001) show that Holbotia was distinct from Ambiortus?

    For that matter, isn't Holbotia a nomen nudum?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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  36. Which version of Pelecaniformes are you using?

    Spinosegnosaurus77/SpongeBobFossilPants

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    1. The traditional, more inclusive sense (including cormorants). I'll likely change that... at some point.

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